Blog :: 05-2016

Your Home's Front Entrance

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You get one chance to make a first impression. Applying that to our homes, then the front door should make a statement.

Adding pizzazz to your front entrance is an easy, low-cost way to up your home’s curb appeal. Try painting your door a pretty shade that coordinates with your home’s color. Make sure there is a contrast between the front door and the facade of the home. An example that works well on a contemporary home is the combination of a striking blue color and soft frosted glass.

However, you don’t have to paint your door a bold color to achieve a striking effect. Sometimes the color of natural wood or stain can bring out the brilliant artistry behind a beautiful antique door. And hardware adds an additional boost to the power of your front entrance. A noteworthy door-knocker creates a powerful statement of elegance on homes of any age.

Other ways to beautify your home’s entry are adding appealing house numbers to your entrance and placing a potted plant or two by the front door, framing the door with color.

 

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    Beaches

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    We have some very nice beaches in our immediate area; some private, some that are restricted to town residents, and some absolutely free. The private beaches include Twin Lakes Beach Club in Salisbury for members and guests only. There is a small, but nice, flat sandy beach, clubhouse, and tennis courts.

    Local town beaches include the Town Grove at Lake Wononscopomuc, in Lakeville, which requires a summer season permit ($50 for town residents, $300 for non-residents) for your vehicle in order to park.

    In Sharon there is the beach at Mudge Pond, which is restricted to town residents; a seasonal permit ($20) is also required to park here. In Norfolk, Tobey Pond is available to residents ($50 seasonal vehicle permit fee).

    In Millerton, there is scenic Rudd Pond at Taconic State Park. Access is open to the public, including non-residents, and it is free during the week and weekends during the off-season. During the summer season, a fee of $7 per car is charged. The beach is particularly nice here, with changing rooms and bathrooms available.

     

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      Spruce Up For Less

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      Just like everything else, first impressions have a lasting impact. If you are preparing to sell your home, use spring cleaning as an opportunity to go a bit further to improve the appearance of your home. Here are some cheap fixes that go a long way.

      • Fertilize your lawn for a fresh, healthy look. All you need is fertilizer, spreader, and a hose.

      • Stain the deck and touch up peeling paint around your entranceways.

      • Sweep under overhangs to clear cobwebs.

      • Fix or upgrade your fence. If it’s in really poor condition, remove it.

      • Replace the errant rock that fell off the wall last year.

      • Trim your trees and bushes.

      • Clean leaves and debris from your yard, and from gutters.

      • Clean windows inside and out.

      • Maybe invest in a new mailbox and doormats.

      • Consider planting a bush or small tree if you have the space.

      A neatly-kept outward appearance goes a long way in setting the tone of your home to a potential buyer. The added bonus is feeling great when you return home every day!

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        Dry Summer?

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        Maybe. There is speculation that the relatively mild winter could lead to a dry summer. We’ll know by September, but it does bring to mind water saving tips for the home. Here are some of the larger residential water guzzlers:

        Toilets use 27%, showers 17%, faucets 16%, and leaks account for 14%. I’m not suggesting we have to spray paint our lawns, but we could cut down. An easy way is to replace older equipment. A new model toilet uses less than 1.6 gallons by law as opposed 3.5 gallons in older models. A new shower head uses 2.5 gallons vs. 6 gallons. Older washers uses 41 gallons, newer models 20.

        Finding leaks, unless you’re standing in water, isn’t as easy. It may take investigating under and around pipes in cupboards and your basement. A spike in your water bill would be a tip off. If your toilet tank sweats in hot weather, there could be a leak. Best way to find a leak in your toilet is to drop colored dye into the tank. Wait 20 minutes to see if it’s in the toilet bowl to confirm a leak.

        For more information on water conservation go to epa.gov/watersense

         

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